Category: Wellbeing

A-Z of dog wellbeing: Zucchini and other vegetables

Today experts claim that 60% of dogs will develop cancer.  A 2005 study found that dogs on a dry commercial pet food diet were 90% less likely to develop cancer if they were fed leafy green vegetables at least 3 times per week.  Dogs fed yellow or orange vegetables were 70% less likely.

If you don’t already offer your dog vegetables, the leftovers from your Christmas dinner are a great opportunity to see what your dog likes, and boost their intake of antioxidants, vitamins and minerals. Continue reading “A-Z of dog wellbeing: Zucchini and other vegetables”

A-Z of dog wellbeing: Yoghurt

Living inside of your dog’s gut are around 1,000 different kinds of bacteria. Paired with other tiny organisms like viruses and fungi, they make what’s known as the microbiota, or the microbiome.

Like a fingerprint, each dog’s microbiota is unique and is determined by their mothers’ microbiota, their environment, diet and lifestyle. It affects everything from the metabolism, cognition, pain, mood, and around 70% of their immune system.

Ensuring your dog gets support to create the best possible composition of gut bacteria is key to both their physical health and also to their behaviour, due to the gut-brain connection, and you can do that with yoghurt! Continue reading “A-Z of dog wellbeing: Yoghurt”

A-Z of dog wellbeing: X-rays and anaesthetics

X-rays have been used for nearly 125 years to identify everything from broken bones and tumours to bullets and other foreign objects in the body. They paint a clear picture for vets to utilise before deciding on the best course of treatment.

If your dog has an injury, falls ill, or displays unusual symptoms, an x-ray may be taken to help identify the problem, however the x-ray process does carry risks for our dogs. Continue reading “A-Z of dog wellbeing: X-rays and anaesthetics”

A-Z of dog wellbeing: Worms

Worms are one of the most common health problems for dogs and if left untreated, worms can damage your dog’s internal organs and cause many health problems, but so can the chemical flea and worm treatments our vets recommend.

Thankfully we can reduce their worm burden naturally and help keep them healthy without resorting to harsh chemicals. Continue reading “A-Z of dog wellbeing: Worms”

A-Z of dog wellbeing: Vaccinations

Dog receiving injectionVaccination plays a central role in protecting dogs from major canine infectious diseases. These include viral and bacterial diseases, which can cause significant illness and are difficult to treat.

Only you and your dog’s vet can decide what vaccinations are necessary for your dog, but it pays to educate yourself to know what the risks and side effects are, what the correct vaccination schedules should be for your dog, not what your vet’s ‘pet loyalty club’ determines is suitable. Continue reading “A-Z of dog wellbeing: Vaccinations”

A-Z of dog wellbeing: Urination

Do you watch your dog when then have a wee?

It might sound like an odd question, but when dogs struggle to urinate, produce abnormally small or large amounts of urine, start leaving little puddles in the house, or have blood in their pee, then it’s time to speak to your vet about a urinary problem. You can also help to support them naturally with a bladder-friendly diet and supplements.
Continue reading “A-Z of dog wellbeing: Urination”

A-Z of dog wellbeing: Rainbow bridge

CalliWhen I lost my first dog, Calli, to cancer in 2012 she left a huge hole in my heat and to say that I was devastated would be the understatement of the year.  I was broken, bereft and inconsolable.

if you know that the time for your pet to leave you is drawing near, there are some ideas you might like to consider to help ease the transition for you both, and help you process emotional loss which can feel overwhelming. Continue reading “A-Z of dog wellbeing: Rainbow bridge”

Trick or Treat!

In our house Halloween used to be a very stressful time as Zen’s autistic tendencies mean that she is very unsettled when we get multiple visitors to our front door.

This is even worse when then come dress as witches, ghosts or skeletons!

To help her out, last year I created a poster asking my neighbours not to knock on my door and it worked a treat, and so this year I thought I’d share it with you!

There are two designs for you to choose from – A black spooky one, or a more printer-friendly white one.  Simply print them out and stick on your door for peace and quiet!

       

Click on the image you’d like and you’ll be linked through to the PDF which you can download, save and print.

Happy Halloween!